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News article18 February 2021

COVID-19 media surveillance - 18 February 2021

This media surveillance collects articles reported through publicly available web sites.

Geolocations mentioned in coronavirus media coverage showing large clusters of news reports.
Geolocations mentioned in coronavirus media coverage showing large clusters of news reports.
© European Union, 2020, EMM/MEDISYS

This media surveillance collects articles reported through publicly available web sites.

It is created with the Europe Media Monitor (EMM).

The selection and placement of stories are determined automatically by a computer program.

Headlines

Twitter

The following news were found among the most mentioned/retweeted items:

  • "Two variants have merged into heavily mutated coronavirus. The UK and California variants of coronavirus appear to have combined into a heavily mutated hybrid, sparking concern that we may be entering a new phase of the covid-19 pandemic" (newscientist)
  • "The coronavirus is here to stay — here’s what that means. A Nature survey shows many scientists expect the virus that causes COVID-19 to become endemic, but it could pose less danger over time." (na`ture)
  • "Chile vaccinated two million people against the coronavirus in less than two weeks" (elespectador)
  • "One-third of troops offered coronavirus vaccine have refused, DOD official tells Congress" (stripes)
  • "Israeli study finds 94% drop in symptomatic COVID-19 cases with Pfizer vaccine" (reuters)

The most mentioned English sources were the New York Times, Reuters, the Washington Post, AP and CNN.

El Diario, El Comercio, El País and Latinus, and Ouest France and Le Monde were among the most mentioned Spanish and French sources, respectively.

Misinformation

444 articles from unverified sources were selected forming 11 supernarratives over the last week:

misinformation_nbr_articles20210218hub.png
© European Union, 2020, EMM/MEDISYS

The treemap shows the narratives and subnarratives associated with anti-vax articles. The colours represent the narratives, while the text indicates each subnarrative. The bigger the size of the box, the higher the number of articles tagged as that narrative and subnarrative.

covid-narratives202100218hub.png
© European Union, 2020, EMM/MEDISYS

Fact Check

  • US fact checkers debunk claims that the CDC inflated COVID-19 deaths by more than 1,600 per cent, noting that these rely on previously debunked claims that the way the CDC requires comorbidity to be reported on death certificates means that many deaths are incorrectly attributed to the virus (usatoday).
  • Fact checkers debunk claims that the flu and other respiratory diseases have “disappeared” as they are all counted as COVID-19 (newtral).
  • Fact checkers debunk a viral social media post claiming that according to a French virologist, vaccinations are responsible for the creation of new coronavirus variants. Fact checkers note that the virologist in question does not make such claims in the original video and she herself cautions against the misinterpretation of her words (afp).
  • Fact checkers debunk Tanzanian President John Magufuli’s claims that “vaccines are dangerous” (polygraph).

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Contact

Mail to JRC-EMM-SUPPORT@ec.europa.eu

Related Content

Europe Media Monitor (EMM)

Medical Information System - MEDISYS

Details

Publication date
18 February 2021